Journal of Conservative Dentistry
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INVITED REVIEW
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 383-389

Sleep bruxism: Current knowledge and contemporary management


1 Department of Dentistry, Sleep Disorders Multi-disciplinary Care Clinic, Ng Teng Fong General Hospital, Jurong Health Services; Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore; School of Science and Technology, SIM University, Singapore
2 Department of and Medicine, Sleep Disorders Multi-disciplinary Care Clinic, Ng Teng Fong General Hospital, Jurong Health Services, Singapore

Correspondence Address:
Adrian U.J. Yap
Department of Dentistry, Ng Teng Fong General Hospital, Jurong Health Services, 1 Jurong East Street 21, 609606
Singapore
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.190007

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Bruxism is defined as the repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by the clenching or grinding of teeth. It can be categorized into awake and sleep bruxism (SB). Frequent SB occurs in about 13% of adults. The exact etiology of SB is still unknown and probably multifactorial in nature. Current literature suggests that SB is regulated centrally (pathophysiological and psychosocial factors) and not peripherally (morphological factors). Cited consequences of SB include temporomandibular disorders, headaches, tooth wear/fracture, implant, and other restoration failure. Chairside recognition of SB involves the use of subjective reports, clinical examinations, and trial oral splints. Definitive diagnosis of SB can only be achieved using electrophysiological tools. Pharmacological, psychological, and dental strategies had been employed to manage SB. There is at present, no effective treatment that “cures” or “stops” SB permanently. Management is usually directed toward tooth/restoration protection, reduction of bruxism activity, and pain relief.


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